Useful, accessible information on circulation and audience development for magazine publishing professionals.

February 24rd 2017

is the 55th day of the year and there are 310 days remaining until the end of the year.

 

TODAY'S NEWS HEADLINES:
Kim Jong-Nam was murdered using a highly toxic chemical known as VX nerve agent, a preliminary report suggests.

U.K. prime minister Theresa May has said the Conservatives' "astounding" victory in the Copeland by-election shows her government "is working for everyone".

China on Friday dismissed renewed pressure from U.S. President Donald Trump over its role in North Korea, saying the crux of the matter was a dispute between Washington and Pyongyang.

President Donald Trump has said he wants the United States to expand its nuclear arsenal, in his first comments on the issue since taking office.

Caitlyn Jenner is taking President Trump to task for his administration’s reversal of a directive on transgender access to public school bathrooms saying "from one Republican to another, this is a disaster." Er... Caitlyn it was a democrat that put the access into play, perhaps you should also change your political affiliation?

Iraqi forces have taken full control of Mosul airport from the Islamic State group, according to a senior commander.

South African police have used rubber bullets, tear gas and
water cannon to try and disperse anti-immigrant protesters in the capital, Pretoria.

Pop star Paolo Nutini has been arrested in his home town of Paisley, Renfrewshire over alleged drink-driving and traffic offences.

BORN TODAY:
1500 – Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor (d. 1558)
1557 – Matthias, Holy Roman Emperor (d. 1619)
1767 – Rama II of Siam (d. 1824)
1827 – Lydia Becker, English-French activist (d. 1890)
1921 – Abe Vigoda, American actor (d. 2016)
1922 – Steven Hill, American actor (d. 2016)
1931 – Brian Close, English cricketer and coach (d. 2015)
1934 – Renata Scotto, Italian soprano


DIED TODAY:
2006 – Dennis Weaver, American actor, director,
and producer (b. 1924)
2006 – Don Knotts, American actor and comedian (b. 1924)
1993 – Bobby Moore, English footballer and manager (b. 1941)
1990 – Malcolm Forbes, American sergeant and publisher (b. 1917)
1810 – Henry Cavendish, French-English physicist
and chemist (b. 1731)
1777 – Joseph I of Portugal (b. 1714)
1563 – Francis, Duke of Guise (b. 1519)
1386 – Charles III of Naples (b. 1345)
616 – Æthelberht of Kent (b. 560)
TODAY IN HISTORY:
1386 – King Charles III of Naples and Hungary is assassinated at Buda.

1607 – L'Orfeo by Claudio Monteverdi, one of the first works recognized as an opera, receives its première performance.

1809 – London's Drury Lane Theatre burns to the ground, leaving owner Richard Brinsley Sheridan destitute.

1848 – King Louis-Philippe of France abdicates the throne.

1918 – Estonian Declaration of Independence.

1920 – The Nazi Party is founded.

1976 – The current constitution of Cuba is formally proclaimed.

1989 – Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini issues a fatwa and offers
a USD $3 million bounty for the death of Salman Rushdie, author of The Satanic Verses.

1989 – United Airlines Flight 811, bound for New Zealand from Honolulu, rips open during flight, blowing nine passengers out of the business-class section.

2008 – Fidel Castro retires as the President of Cuba and the Council of Ministers after 32 years. He remains as head of the Communist Party for another 3 years.

2016 – Tara Air Flight 193, a de Havilland Canada DHC-6
Twin Otter aircraft, crashed, with 23 fatalities, in Solighopte,
Myagdi District, Dhaulagiri Zone, while en route from Pokhara
Airport to Jomsom Airport.
AND ANOTHER THING!
I have three rather daunting anniversaries looming,
but am I downhearted?

Click here to read.

For previous 'And Another Thing' articles, click here.

LATEST STRAIGHT TALK
The Good Old Days - Part II.
Click here to read.

For previous 'Straight Talk' articles, click here.
CircSpot.com publishes cartoons from time to time; to check out some of the best, click here.

Day 55 of 365: National Artist Day (Thailand)
NEW CFO FOR NEWS CORP.
Susan Panuccio is her name and she 'most recently worked at News Corp Australia as chief financial officer in Sydney' says Abigail Dawson at mumbrella.com.au. Ms. Panuccio, who once upon a time was the CFO of News UK 'is replacing former CFO Bedi Singh.' For more, click here.


REGIONAL U.K. NEWSPAPER LOSSES.
'U.K. regional daily newspapers audited by ABC' reports Dominic Ponsford at Press Gazette 'lost print sales at an average rate of 12.5% year on year in 2016.' Mind you while this is bad news on the print side, Mr. Ponsford notes 'nearly every regional newspaper website audited by ABC recorded strong growth in the second half of 2016.'

The Manchester Evening News did very well as did London's Evening Standard web site. 'The fastest-growing site was Johnston Press’s News Letter in Belfast, up 67%' notes Mr. Ponsford. 

While the U.K. daily regional press fell 12.5%; the weekly regional press faired slightly better with a drop of 11.2% with 'all but a handful of the 228 weekly newspapers audited by ABC lost sales year on year.' For more on U.K. regional dailies, click here; weeklies, click here and web traffic, click here.


USPS DRONES ON.
WWD REDUCES EDITONS... AND STAFF.
'Women’s Wear Daily... will be altering its print schedule for the second time in two years and letting go of several staffers' says Sami Main at adweek.com.

In effect, the only issues that will be printed are "special" editions and Miles Socha, the editor-in-chief told staff "we will continue to produce print issues, more selectively; daily in tandem with key industry events and seasonally following fashion weeks."

'According to WWD' says Ms. Main 'eight positions were eliminated last week.' For more, click here.


IT'S REAL SIMPLE GETTING HEARST'S BEST TALENT.
First it was Leslie Yazel 'who jumped from Cosmo to become the new editor-in-chief of Real Simple' says Keith J. Kelly at the New York Post and Real Simple 'continues to reshape the masthead with Hearst talent.' This time it is the art director's position and Geraldson “Gino” Chua from Esquire is filling it. For more, click here.

Day 54 of 365: National Day (Brunei)
FACEBOOK DOES NOT CARE ABOUT CONTENT...
... something we have said for a long long time now, in fact we think Facebook cares basically about Facebook and we might have found a supporter of our thoughts in the form of Katherine Viner of The Guardian.

'Speaking at last night’s Guardian Live event' reports Abigail Dawson at mumbrella.com.au 'he editor-in-chief implied the social media site is careless about content, blurring the lines between the truth and fake news.'

“I’m not sure how crucial news organizations are to him (Mark Zuckerberg). To him it’s just about content, it’s not about good, factual content, true content, it’s just content,” she said .Ms. Viner points out that 'every time you form any action on Facebook, just liking something, you are doing their work for them by feeding their algorithm that makes their profits' and there is lots more including Ms. Viner's thoughts on Facebook's profitability. For more, click here.

Last year Ms. Viner gave her thoughts about The Sun's 'exclusive' about the Queen supporting Brexit and the video on the right shows her giving her answer to that and other things which were in the news a year ago.


tronc AD REVENUE FALLS... BUT THERE IS A PROFIT.
'There were no major surprises with tronc’s fourth quarter earnings report' says D.B. Hebbard at Talking New Media although D.B. does add 'that itself was a bit of a surprise (at least for me).'

tronc is the very silly name of what used to be Tribune Publishing and despite the fall in advertising revenue the company made a profit, mainly says D.B. 'due to reduced headcount.'

Oh, and there is other news, Timothy P. Knight is... well, we won't steal D. B.'s thunder, click here for more.

FT CUTS EDITORIAL STAFF.
The Financial Times 'is eliminating 20 editorial jobs globally through attrition to cut costs as print revenue declines' reports Joe Mayes at bloomberg.com. The company, now owned by Japan’s Nikkei Inc. 'is offering a handful of voluntary buyouts and won’t replace some people who are leaving' scribes Mr. Mayes and also notes 'the FT is trying to reduce its dependence on ads and focus on boosting subscription revenues.' For more, click here.
LAST YEAR IT WAS THE HOT TOPIC, THIS YEAR... NOT SO MUCH, UNTIL NOW?
'Ad blocking remains a serious threat for British consumer magazine group Dennis' says Jessica Davies at digiday.com. Over the last six months the company has not been lazy, they have been busy 'testing a variety of ad blocking messages across four of its brands' and soon the winner will be rolled out.

To find out what Dennis Publishing learned, click here.

The contrarian publisher:
Ian Hislop on fake news and Private Eye's digital abstinence.


Day 53 of 365: Celebrity Day (Church of Scientology)
OUR BUSINESS PROBABLY SHOULD BE AUDITED, BUT PERHAPS IT IS TIME FOR THE CONTENT DELIVERERS TO CALL THE SHOTS.
As an industry we have done rather well in regulating ourselves. In the past publishers saw the value of an audit because the value of the audit was easy to see - it generated revenue.

Publishers were producing a product, in most cases a magazine or a newspaper, and they met the demands of the advertisers, then the fan got covered. As a result publishers changed strategies and saw digital products as a way to offset losses. Publisher also learned that "digital" could offer them something the past could not - instant analyses.

No longer were publishers (and advertisers) bound by a report that came out once every six months, now they could analyze almost anything instantaneously.

Some audit bureau adapted, some did not and not all audit bureaus are created equal.

Recently many Australian publishers all but abandoned their audits and advertisers did not seem to mind.
This may not be a good thing but unless there are standards it is very difficult to judge - and it seems as though Australia, like the U.S. lowered it standards. AMAA (Audited Media Association of Australia) CEO Josanne Ryan says 'over recent weeks I've met with media agencies and major clients to gather feedback on the departure of large magazine publishers from the ABC circulation audit. They've indicated a consistent view that this is a backward step and would impact how they evaluate the print channel.'

There could be many reasons for these views, especially as it seems it was the larger publishers that left the Australian audit body, who no doubt paid more than the smaller publishers. Smaller publishers could indeed see this as a "backward step" - because they may end up paying more.

The value of an audit is confirmation that what the publisher/content deliverer stated in their statement was true - and more and more we know from social media outlets especially that data can been manipulated - Facebook videos is a good example. Strictly speaking Facebook were not wrong; they just neglected to mention most videos were viewed for less than three seconds. However, if the standards are not there, is there a point to an independent audit.
In the comments section of Josanne Ryan's article George Orwell makes an excellent point, he says 'the circulation audit should still be relevant, however the controls appear to have been loosened recently; no doubt to tie up as much support as possible from the publishers. An example of this was late last year when News Corp papers were provided for “free” with purchase at Coles supermarkets.

Auditors in the past would have put a line through this type of communication, as it contravenes the “spirit” of the audit rules.' He concludes his comment 'hence the Audit Bureau appear to have loosened up on rule interpretations, because, in the past, this promotion would not have been acceptable.' And this is the key - interpretation.

For many years, publishers' circulation statements reflected what the advertiser demanded but times have changed and more and more content deliverers can make a profit with circulation that in all honesty reflects quantity more than quality. If this becomes the new "norm" and it just about has, audit bureaus around the world need to start auditing what publishers actually do - and they need to move away from the six-month statement routine and move to an audit that is more immediate.

GRAYDON CARTER IS AT IT AGAIN.
You may think Graydon Carter is President Trump's favorite editor, if you do think this, please mail us the dope you are smoking straight away! Well the good news is that Mr. Carter 'originator of the “short-fingered vulgarian” descriptor' as Corrine Grinapol at adweek.com reminds us is at it again.

He is using the editor's letter in the latest Vanity Fair to comment on the Trump White House and notes that we are exhausted. 'Exhausted from the lies, the alternative facts, the boasts, the conflicts, and the scandals from this “fine-tuned machine”,' scribes Mr. Carter who continues 'exhausted from having craven boneheads chosen to lead departments governing the environment, the Treasury, education, and the interior. Exhausted from an administration that turns a blind eye to Russian intrusions into Crimea, our election, and the imminent elections in Europe.' Don't know about you but we have even more respect for Mr. Vanity Fair than ever before. For more of Mr. Carter's letter, click here.





EXTRA! EXTRA! READ ALL ABOUT IT!
'The Evening Standard is moving to a single print edition per day' reports Dominic Ponsford at Press Gazette and says 'there is a proposal that long-serving sub-editors will be moved to half-days and half pay.'

Once upon a time it had five editions a day which people paid money for and it was up against at least one evening newspaper that some felt was better than the Standard. 'The Standard had been going to press at 11am or 11.15am, with a second ‘slip’ edition going out at 12.30pm for later breaking news which would get into the last few hundred thousand copies of the daily 900,000 print-run' says Mr. Ponsford; now some of the newspaper will be printed the day before. For more, click here.



Day 52 of 365: Armed Forces Day (South Africa)
GARDENS ILLUSTRATED GETS NEW EDITOR.
Published by Immediate Media the new editor of Gardens Illustrated is Lucy Bellamy, who will join the company next month.

'Lucy... will lead the editorial teams across the monthly print title and www.gardensillustrated.com' reports P.P.A. and she will report to the magazines publisher Marie Davies.
Currently Ms. Bellamy is Gardening Editor at Modern Gardens magazine and in the past has written freelance for The Guardian as well as authoring a book. For more, click here.

THE PECKER ROSE, AND HAVING RISEN MOVED ON.
It seems as though the deal twixt American Media Inc. and Wenner Media is off. According to Keith J. Kelly at the New York Post 'the buzz is that the personal antipathy between David Pecker — head of AMI — and [Jann] Wenner as much as the price caused the deal to collapse.

It is reported that other suitors are at hand, we wait with baited breath. For more of Mr. Kelly's report, click here.


FAIRFAX TO SPIN OFF DOMAIN?
'Fairfax Media looks set to spin off Domain' reports Miranda Ward at mumbrella.com.au 'as a separately listed entity on the Australian Securities Exchange .'

TO SUE... OR NOT TO SUE...
'Everyone has been throwing the phrase “fake news” around rather freely' says Erik Sass at mediapost.com but he warns us to be careful because doing so 'can get you sued.' The Daily Sentinel of Grand Junction says Mr. Sass 'is threatening to sue a state senator for defamation after he accused the newspaper of publishing fake news. Seems as though there is a bit of a fight between the Daily Sentinel and Colorado State Senator Ray Scott - for a blow by blow account, click here for Mr. Sass's report.


SO WHO WILL BE THE NEW ALEXANDRA?
'Last month, Alexandra Shulman... editor in chief of British Vogue... shocked the fashion world by announcing that she was stepping down' says Elizabeth Paton at the New York Times. The news broke during Paris fashion week which got tongues wagging as to whom was to replace Ms. Shulman. This was all a month ago, Paris is over but says Ms. Paton 'the chatter shows no signs of abating.' So is there a front runner among the gossipers? Not sure if there is a front runner, but there are a 'number of names are now in the frame, with industry watchers placing odds on contenders.' For more, click here.


MARKETING WEEK WILL NOT BE MARKETING MONTHLY WHEN IT CHANGES FREQUENCY.
Centaur Media the publisher of the U.K.'s Marketing Week is planning to move away from print and part of that strategy is to change the frequency of Marketing Week from weekly to monthly.

'The brand is set to keep its title, despite the change from a weekly publication' scribes Freddie Mayhew at the Press Gazette. Another publication published by the company is also changing frequency and that is The Lawyer. For more details, click here.
TEXAS MONTHLY CHANGES DIRECTION - PERHAPS NOT.
The Columbia Journalism Review published a story yesterday detailing how Texas Monthly under its new editor-in-chief was taking the magazine in a "lifestyle" direction. However, the editor-in-chief that spoke to the CJR has written that he may have given the CJR the wrong impression and published a note on the magazine's web site. Don't ask us, you can figure it out by clicking the links.


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Content marketing specialists know there is a great return on investments especially when teamed up with a quality telemarketing... Ronen Ben-Dror explores some options. Click here to read.

Native advertising is here to stay, probably. It is a good thing, possibly. So why can't Glen Martin decide whether he likes native or not? Click here to read.

We act as if “native advertising” is something new, so what is it and how should we best use it... an introduction to "native advertising!" Click here to read.

Just how safe is your data? With so much data held by publishers, could it be "hacked?" Elaine Tyson and Roy Beagley asked the people that know, the fulfillment bureaus themselves. Click here to read.

The Interactive Advertising Bureau found that more than a third of web traffic is fraudulent and BPA says only 40% of ads measured are actually viewable, but how much of a problem is this? Click here to read more....

Telemarketers are well aware of the Personal Identifier Question and recent changes in rules regarding the PIQ have caused somewhat of a debate in the industry. Ronen Ben-Dror of Blue Valley Telemarketing takes a look at what gives. Click here to read more....

Customers of telemarketing services often commission work without undertaking even the most elementary checks. What should the informed customer look for when choosing an outbound telemarketing agency? Click here to read,

Publishers need to address the USPS's suggested increase before it is too late. Click here to read,

Social media channels today are playing an interesting role in the future and the publishing world now views social media as a positive exchange with subscribers, so To Tweet or Not to Tweet, That Tis the Question Click here to read more....

How Well Do You Know Your Audience? The more you know, says Ronen Ben-Dror, this could eliminate the battle of qualifying leads. Click here to read more....

When executing a direct mail program, you should give lots of thought to the requirements of merge/purge. This could end up saving you a great deal of money, not forgetting making your life a great deal easier. Karen Tyson explains...

5 Mistakes You Should Avoid When Planning Your Audience Development Efforts by Kinjal Husges. Click here to read more....

To develop a realistic circulation forecast based upon current economic, industry, and company conditions is part of any circulation director's job. Benefit from the accountant's view and read Peter Sangiorgio's 5 Simple Tips to consider when developing a Circulation Budget. Click here for Peter's insight.

Businesses that put their customers front and center will ultimately win and the secret to successfully scaling CRM practices into any large organization is to really understand your markets. Benefit from Pam's years of experience and learn how to segment your file and become a success. Click here for Pam's insight.

Sending out a direct mail campaign requires a good lettershop operation... Karen Tyson explains....

For years the concept of earning and deferring income has confused many, but it is not that difficult. Get the facts behind earned and deferred income from Peter Sangiorgio. Click here to read more....

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Cash flow is probably the most important resource any business has. Benefit from Peter's insight and knowledge. Click here to read this exclusive article.

Circulation can be an asset on a sales call. Peter Lenahan explains what to do, and as importantly not what to do in this exclusive article. Click here!

How to manage a telemarketing campaign and make it work for you. Karen Tyson explains....

While all major publishers maintain marketing databases, it is just as important for small publishers too. Pam would argue it’s more important than ever to maintain a database as a tool for identifying, developing and implementing strategy. Click here!

Getting a direct mail package printed takes advance planning. Karen Tyson has some thoughts and ideas as to how to make this sometimes daunting prospect easier to handle... Karen Tyson explains....

Rebecca Sterner is one of the most respected people in the audience development job function. Now you can benefit from Rebecca's knowledge on Setting Up an Auto Renewal Program. Click here.

Enjoy and benefit from this exclusive article for CircSpot.com written by Peter Lenahan who explains why the circulation staff keep the sales force motivated, and how that benefits all concerned. Click here!

Reader's response: One of most intelligent articles I have ever read on ad sales and the all-important relationship with circulation. Well said. Harry S, Sacramento, Calif - via email.

Free magazines are different from "Controlled" as we all know, but the distinction is becoming less and less relevant to advertisers. Click here!

Evaluating how a campaign is working while agents are in the process of communicating with current or potential clients, live monitoring is an essential tool. Can companies afford to waste all those efforts on a careless approach to monitoring the campaign? Of course not. Click here to read more....

An accurate call list is an extremely important aspect in waging a successful telemarketing campaign. Scrubbing the list is the responsibility of the publishing company and the telemarketing agency. Click here to read more....
 

Virtually all marketing campaigns are most successful when they employ a multi-channel approach to a targeted audience... even in the "all-digital" world. Click here to read more....

On October 16th last year, a new regulation from the FCC went into effect. Ronen Ben-Dror asks how does the FCC rule affect you in the B2B environment? Click here to read more....

 
     
LES, POVS AND COMMENTARIES.
PROMOTIONS WE HAVE RECEIVED - AND WHY THEY ARE GOOD (OR BAD?)

 

WWD does good email subscription promotions.  This one is hard to resist.  It’s got a good subject line – “URGENT:  Prices Going up in July.  Lock in Lower Rate Today”.  The email subject line is just like envelope teaser copy – it has to pull prospects into the promotion and this one accomplishes the mission.

The copy and design is clean, colorful and loaded with benefits – the biggest of course is “Beat the prince increase!  Last chance for Current Rate”.

And, if you order with this offer, you can also save 20% on the 6 month online access price and pay only $59.  It looks as if this might actually be a last chance.  And, it’s always good to think a last chance offer might actually be a last chance for something.  This offer was overused in mail efforts – but you don’t see it as often in email. The offer is used to good effect here.

There’s a prominent Subscribe button to make ordering easy.  Following that is a picture of the web site and arrows that call out the features of the site.  Clearly, WWD offers a lot for the money.  And as subscription promotions are all about the offer, this is a winner. To see a larger version of the offer, click here.

This TV Guide gift effort is colorful and loaded with smart ideas – a two for one offer, special donor renewal price, holiday gift cards, multiple premiums and a reply-by date to move prospects along.

This is a very good email offer for a subscription to the print edition of WWD.  There is a lot to recommend the creative.  First, the email looks the way you expect WWD to look – smart, elegant and intriguing.

Second, the copy is filled with proven direct marketing technique.  The headline says “Summer Special for Industry Insiders” and that’s an appeal to the recipient’s ego.  It’s very flattering to be considered an industry insider and to be recognized as such by an industry leader such as WWD is even more appealing.  If done correctly, flattering prospects is a smart move.

There is a very strong subscription offer being made and the email leads with that offer – a 34% price saving on a six month subscription.  Offers drive promotions and it’s important as a marketer to remember that fact. 

You can’t miss the call to action – a GET IT NOW button to order coupled with a prominent respond by date.  This technique generally moves prospects along to order as it creates a fear of missing out.  Direct marketers have used reply by dates for years and years in mailed offers.

There are also benefits offered in addition to the special subscription price – more content, a new, bolder look and “extras” such as daily email of top stories and three issues of Beauty Inc.

This email offer uses smart direct marketing technique developed through many years of print campaign testing and marries it to the immediacy of email.  It’s difficult to ask for more.

We recently received an interesting direct mail package offering a subscription to House Beautiful magazine.  It’s interesting for a number of reasons. Click on the picture below for more details.
The New York Times wants me back - nice. An outer envelope that perforates on the right, left and top which then revels a single order form and a postage paid reply envelope (not shown.) It is an interesting offer '50% off for 16 weeks' - the 50% off I understand, but the 16 weeks has me a tad confused... more than a quarter, less than a half and not quite a third. If it was intended to get me thinking, it did.

I can get all the digital elements my little heart desires and access to nytimes.com. Ordering is made easy, I can phone, go online even use the USPS and try and reduce their losses.

Sadly, the reason I canceled my subscription weighs heavier on my mind as does the all-singing, all dancing offer I received, so for the moment NYT - thanks, but no thanks. To enlarge the image on the left, click on the image.
We recently received the regular offer from Opera News and this offer, like our old nanny Mary Poppins is practically perfect in every way. '3 Risk-Free Issues' always a vote grabber, a free gift offer of a CD, an involvement device, savings of 68%, and a reply by instruction. We may have died and gone to heaven!

Inside, or the reverse depending on your point of view, 'Free' is mentioned not once, nor twice but four times in as many paragraphs and an excellent re-stating of what we are going to get, or not if we don't reply in ten days. The Free issues are even restated on the reply card. Whoever wrote and designed this should be sent a bag of onions, because they sure as hell know them. It looks good, does all the right things and Opera News mail it regularly, so we can conclude that it works for them. (Click here or on the thumbnail to view larger image.


We received our monthly renewal offer from TV Guide this week, and it does all the right things and looks good, and makes ordering very simple. As with many publications the actual renewal date is not mentioned, something which annoys me as a subscriber, but pleases me as a marketer - can you tell I am a Gemini? IF you click on the image above, you can see what happens at the ordering stage, although this is made as simple as possible. Interestingly, for an online order form, and a renewal form at that, TV Guide offers a Bill Me option.
Here's a good offer from Oracle Magazine for a qualified controlled publication. It has good benefits copy and makes requesting Oracle Magazine easy with a couple of "Subscribe Now" buttons.  There is interesting PS copy offering a new publication for those who might be interested in Java Magazine as well as Oracle. The design is clean, uncluttered and attractive. To view the offer, click here. Not sure why the publisher is only offering six free issues, but given the quality of the promotion there must be a very good reason.

Here is the latest offering from People magazine. Nice personalized outer envelope, and a simple and concise brochure showing good covers and copy that sells the subscription. To order, it's old school, snail mail - no mention of ordering via the web anywhere. Nice package and well done to People for knowing that direct mail via the post office is still a good way to get orders.

Click on the image to see large versions.
people
Here’s what appears to be an advance renewal offer from Vegetarian Times.  It’s a renewal sweeps – smart idea because the original sub order was placed through PCH.  We’re assuming it’s an advance renewal as only one copy of the subscription has been received thus far.  The offer is a strong one –a 78% saving on the renewal plus a chance to win $25,000 (along with other prizes).  Package includes clever “sweeps” techniques on the outer envelope, an offer deadline and small flyer detailing prizes.  Good job, Vegetarian Times!

Click on the image to see large versions.
people
We received this double postcard from GQ magazine. The card looks great, has a nice cover and a nice free gift, but also has a rather confusing offer. '24 issues of GQ for only $20.00 - that's 83c (plus 17 cents shipping and handling) per issue; in other words $24.00 then. If you add 83 cents to 17 cents, you get $1.00 which if you then multiply by 24 issues you get $24.00. Click on the image to see large versions.
people
When my subscription of 'The Week' arrived last week, inside the envelope was an offer for 12 issues of 'The Oldie' magazine. As far as I am aware these magazines are independent of each other, but have a great deal in common.

This is a nice way of promoting a magazine that is probably already known to readers of another magazine and would be fairly cheap to produce and execute. Nice offer. Click on the image for a larger view of the outside and inside.
people
Always nice to get something from 'The Economist' as they always do things so well.

A free copy of 'The World in 2013' is a nice incentive for the readers among us, and a free tablet cover for the tecchies to boot - which also indirectly pushes the digital version.

The predominant red is great as it screamed "ECONOMIST" as soon as I opened my email. Oh and 69c a copy, they got me! [Click here or on image for large version].
people
'People' really knows how to use it's house file. Good offer, nice creative and use of personalization.

The offer is strong and the order form is pre-populated - what's not to love?
people
(Click on the image to see larger size and also the order form page.

This is an interesting offer. On the one hand it pushes newsstand sales, you can save $1.00 if you print out the coupon. However if you clicked on the Save $1.00 link you can also subscribe and get eight issues free.

An offer is an offer,
even though this offer
is not publishing related,
it has ignored basic
promotion rule 1-0-1:
Know Thy Prospect!

I AM NOT A
MEDICARE RECIPIENT!


To view larger size, click on the above image.

A recent offer from People magazine. It looks simple but a great deal of thought has gone into this offer, not least the cover featured on the tablets.


To view larger size, click on the above image.
Let's state it up front - we know the email at the end of the link is spam. Even so, it is a great example of why some design is a good thing in email promotions - even text only promotions. We cannot believe anyone who got this email would even have got so far a clicking a link! Click here to see the email, which is a screen shot taken from our computer.

Rebecca Sterner wrote on CircSpot on how to set up an autorenewal. It just so happens that today we received our auto renewal for Time. In all honesty we had not planned to renew it, but it is done, and although we could cancel it, $81.00 for 56 issues is not worth the hassle of canceling, so we guess the auto renewal worked... at least in our case.


To view larger size, click on the above image.
A CircSpot.com reader looked for something on the Times of London web site, and this popped up while the page they wanted to view was loading. He liked it, took a picture, and sent it to us - thanks Glyn C-R of Buckinghamshire.

To view larger size, click on the above image.

A CircSpot.com reader subscribed to Fast Company and paid $10.00 for a subscription. After placing the order, they received an email offering a $5.00 credit if she can get another person to subscribe in the next 6 hours. This seemed like a very clever idea to the the person who sent us the information - and we agree.

To view larger size, click on the above image.

Here's a nice promotion from The Nation.  It's quick to read, offers an invitation to receive exclusive free offers - it's a flattering offer and comes from a credible publication.

It ultimately leads you to a subscription landing page offering 4 free issues (very strong offer) plus attractive subscription prices and a choice of format - print or online access.
The promotion is clean and uncluttered with enough enticing benefits to attract readership.



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